What meets the eye…

Today’s guest entry is by Rajashree Patankar, from India, who is writing about her startup experience with Eyeware and her team: Yik long Lee (Hong Kong Chinese), Noah Lev (Canadian/Dutch), Elpida Lygerou (Greek), Beatrice Maccaferri (Italian), and Tiago Santos (Portuguese).

How wonderful would it be if you could read someone’s eyes effortlessly! Imagine a world where things work at the wink of an eye and not at the click of a mouse. The world is evolving and so are our needs with the advent of technology in our lives. Eye tracking is that opportune technology that can change the way we perceive things. Eyeware is the startup revolutionizing the integration of human-machine interaction in everyday life. Continue reading “What meets the eye…”

Take care of the moments

Today’s guest entry is by our Australian / British participant, Matthew Costello. 

If we take care of the moments, the years will take care of themselves.

Coming into the program I expected the intensity to be overwhelming and I was not disappointed. It can be described as nothing short of a tidal wave. You arrive at the ‘beach’ and everything looks pretty. Continue reading “Take care of the moments”

Danish Design Awards Potential Finalist

Today’s guest entry is written by Patricia Nyberg, who is working with the startup moveART along with her team (from the left in the below photo): Carel Hoffman (South African),  Patricia Nyberg, (Finnish), Viktor Bisovetskyi (Ukrainian),  Louis Lozouet (Brazilian/French), Zehra Ali (American), and Baiyu Li (Chinese).

 Group 9

Continue reading “Danish Design Awards Potential Finalist”

The ups and downs of entrepreneurship

Today’s guest entry is a follow up from Thibault on his startup experience with Hydromea (see his post from January)

Have you ever wondered what it was like to have your own business? I’m not talking about the glossy life as CEO of a listed company. I’m talking about the venture, the ad-venture, the part just after you have come up with a brilliant idea, the sort of idea that you think no one has thought of and everyone is trying to steal from you. This part is usually an emotional roller-coast for entrepreneurs, in which they go through the exhilaration of seeing unlimited opportunities in countless markets and at the same time wonder how come they still don’t generate stable cash flows although they have a PhD and a patent! Continue reading “The ups and downs of entrepreneurship”

Nearing the end of Chapter 1..

Sitting in my group down in the “dungeons” and looking around, I see 5 pairs of squinting eyes staring intently at laptop screens with eyebrows furrowed in concentration as we work on 3 projects/assignments concurrently. Up on the board in our group room, we have 6 looming project deadlines scribbled in big red font all of which seem to be within a few days of each other and the last of which reads “EXAMS!!!”. Between preparing for the final startup pitch, leadership essays, and group macroeconomics project, it’s hard to believe that the pace has continued to pick up even beyond what we thought was a crescendo with the integrative exercises. Even more incredible, is how our group dynamics have been forged by the fires of stress and pressure to make us orders of magnitudes more efficient than we were when we set out. If you would have asked me last month how much excess work capacity we have left, I would have answered “hardly any”. But somehow, we have evolved how we work to the point that we can do a full analysis of a case and prepare slides and a 15-minute presentation in an impossibly short amount of time.

I’ve worked on teams and in groups for most of my career but I don’t think I truly understood how powerful a group with seemingly nothing in common can become over the course of a couple of months. When you’re subjected to an impossibly large amount of work you learn how to optimally leverage each group member’s strengths to deliver as quickly as possible and become greater than the sum of your parts. I initially thought that 3 months was a long time to be in one group of 6 people but I now know that there are certain learnings that you don’t realize until you’ve felt the grind for some time. And so, as our time together as a group comes to an end in a couple of weeks, I do feel sad and know that I will miss working with my 5 compatriots very much. But I also think that what I’ve learned working with the group over the past few months will make me that much better in the next group.

On a more fun note, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the class trip to Chamonix and the Nespresso factory visit last week. As a way to blow off some steam from the pressure cooker, we all went up to Chamonix in France for a morning of snow-shoeing and a fantastic fondue lunch. Leaving the IMD bubble was definitely a welcome escape and some of us chose to stay an extra night in Chamonix for a beautiful sunny day of skiing the next day. This combined with a class trip to the Nespresso factory (see pictures in the previous post) last week to see the coffee pod making process allowed us to mentally disconnect for a couple of half-days and spend some time with our classmates doing something most of us have never done before.

Another few twists to break from the routine of classes every day come in the form of guest speakers that add a real-world element to the theories we’re learning. These guest speakers are often the subject of the cases we’re assigned to read before class and we’re often surprised to find them in class adding some colour with their experiences. We then often break out in groups and provide recommendations to them to help them solve real issues. These guest speakers range from senior executives at large multinational companies to entrepreneurs at smaller businesses. In all cases, I’ve been very impressed with this aspect of the program.

Now I have to sign off and chip away at those big red deadlines on our board!

Til next time!

Cheers,

Mo